Public Health Officials Face Wave Of Threats, Pressure Amid Coronavirus Response

Emily Brown was stretched thin.

As the director of the Rio Grande County Public Health Department in rural Colorado, she was working 12- and 14-hour days, struggling to respond to the pandemic with only five full-time employees for more than 11,000 residents. Case counts were rising.

She was already at odds with county commissioners, who were pushing to loosen public health restrictions in late May, against her advice. She had previously clashed with them over data releases and had haggled over a variance regarding reopening businesses.

But she reasoned that standing up for public health principles was worth it, even if she risked losing the job that allowed her to live close to her hometown and help her parents with their farm.

Then came the Facebook post: a photo of her and other health officials with comments about their weight and references to “armed citizens” and “bodies swinging from trees.”

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School lunch—a vegetarian’s delight? | Health Beat

An abundance of vegetarian choices is popular at every meal. (For Spectrum Health Beat)

Offering more vegetarian choices in school cafeterias significantly cuts meat consumption without hurting overall sales, British researchers report.

In more than 94,000 college cafeteria choices studied, doubling vegetarian options (from 1 in 4 choices to 2 in 4) reduced purchases of meaty meals by 40-80%.

“Replacing some meat or fish with more vegetarian options might seem obvious, but as far as we know no one had tested it before,” said lead author Emma Garnett, a conservationist at the University of Cambridge in England. “Solutions that seem obvious don’t always work, but it would appear that this one does.”

Shifting to a more plant-based diet is one of the most effective ways to reduce the environmental impact of food production, she said.

When more vegetarian choices were available, they were popular at every meal and meat eaters

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