The Mysterious White House Testing Scheme That Did Not Protect Trump

President Donald Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis is raising fresh questions about the White House’s strategy for testing and containing the virus for a president whose cavalier attitude about the coronavirus has persisted since it landed on American shores.

The president has said others are tested before getting close to him, appearing to hold it as an iron shield of safety. He has largely eschewed mask-wearing and social distancing in meetings, travel and public events, while holding rallies for thousands of often maskless supporters. 

The Trump administration has increasingly pinned its coronavirus testing strategy for the nation on antigen tests, which do not need a traditional lab for processing and quickly return results to patients. But the results are less accurate than those of the slower PCR tests. 

Testing “isn’t a ‘get out of jail free card,’” said Dr.

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Plan to rake? Don’t fall into trouble | Health Beat

Be mindful of your posture and equipment when raking and you’ll likely spare yourself some aches and pains. (For Spectrum Health Beat)

Jumping in piles of leaves can be great fun, but raking them up afterward can leave you with an aching back.

Each year, more than 76,000 Americans are hurt while raking leaves or using other manual garden tools. That’s according to The Center for Physical Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine.

One reason why these injuries may occur is that raking leaves forces people to use several different muscle groups, the center explained. But certain precautions can help people doing yard work avoid these injuries.

Sports medicine and physical rehabilitation specialists advise taking the following steps:

  • Warm up and cool down. Just like any physical activity, it’s important to warm up before raking leaves. It’s also a good idea to stretch first. Try trunk rotation, shoulder and wrist stretches. Once
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